Blog

Home Blog Iconic Lighthouses In Australia Part 5

Iconic Lighthouses In Australia Part 5

CATEGORY : Lighthouses Australia

Posted by Tony Sheer on Mar 15, 2012

Here in Australia, we are lucky enough to be surrounded by some of the most historic and beautiful lighthouses in the world. Tourists to the coast will relish in the spectacular views and history presented in each location, so why not take your family to visit one of these iconic lighthouses in Australia for your next holiday?

Moore Point Lighthouse – Western Australia
The first all-steel lightstation to be built on mainland Australia, Moore Point is currently the oldest surviving station in Western Australia to be under Federal control. Built in 1878 after the foundations were laid in the wrong place the year before, the height of this lighthouse in Australia is unknown but it stands at 35 metres above sea level.

Penguin Island Lighthouse – South Australia
Sitting alone on Penguin Island, this lightstation could only be reached during good weather due to the dangerous rocks surrounding the island. Built in 1878, this lighthouse in Australia stands at 10.8 metres tall and 24 metres above sea level. It can now only be visited by boat and visitors require a permit, as the island has since been declared a bird sanctuary.

Double Island Point Lighthouse – Queensland
Constructed in the typical Queensland fashion of metal cladding on a timber frame, this lightstation was built to guide ships around a dangerous portion of the Great Barrier Reef. Built in 1884, this lighthouse in Australia stands at 12 metres tall and 96 metres above sea level. It is only accessible via 4-wheel drive along Rainbow Beach.

Eddystone Point Lighthouse – Tasmania

Located inside the Mount William National Park and surrounded on all sides by ocean, this lightstation was built to steer ships clear of the hazards of Victoria Rocks, Georges Rocks and Black Reef. Built in 1889, this lighthouse in Australia stands at 35 metres tall and 42 metres above sea level. The lightstation is known in nearby Gladstone for its pink granite construction.

Thankfully, most lighthouses in Australia have been well-cared for by heritage and state government groups, which allows tourists to view the stations as they would have once appeared in all their glory.